Using Anthropometry to Optimize Nutrition Programs in the Management of Acute Malnutrition

Event start date
Event start time
13.00
Place

Arvo building, auditorium F114, address: Lääkärinkatu 1.

Doctoral defence of MPH Nancy Dale

Using Anthropometry to Optimize Nutrition Programs in the Management of Acute Malnutrition

The field of science of the dissertation is International health.

The opponent is Professor Stan Zlotkin (University of Toronto, Canada). Professor Per Ashorn acts as the custos.

The language of the dissertation defence is English.

Using Anthropometry to Optimize Nutrition Programs in the Management of Acute Malnutrition

Almost 19 million children under the age of 5 suffer from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) at any given time. Nutritional status of children is based on anthropometric measurements such as weight, height, and mid-upper arm circumference. There have been various growth references/standards created that include tables allowing for the interpretation of anthropometric measurements as they are related to each other such as weight-for-height Z-score.  These standards/references are derived from healthy children and are a benchmark towards which nutritional status of other children are compared. They are used to determine the degree of malnutrition that children are experiencing; the prevalence of malnutrition in a population that is present at a given time; and provide guidance for admission criteria into nutrition programs thus determining which children should receive treatment.

The Community Management of Acute Malnutrition model is used to treat children between the ages of 6 and 59 months suffering from malnutrition and involves both outpatient care and inpatient care depending on whether the children have medical complications. There are many factors involved in the process of counting, identifying, predicting, and selecting children in need of treatment in therapeutic nutrition programs as well as the monitoring and appropriate criteria for finishing treatment. This PhD research consists of five studies which explored how to use anthropometric indices to optimize therapeutic nutrition programs.

                                               ******

The dissertation is published in the publication series of Acta Universitatis Tamperensis; 2253, Tampere University Press, Tampere 2017. ISBN 978-952-03-0338-9, ISSN 1455-1616. The dissertation is also published in the e-series Acta Electronica Universitatis Tamperensis; 1754, Tampere University Press 2017. ISBN 978-952-03-0339-6, ISSN 1456-954X.

Additional information