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university of tampere: faculty of management: studies: master's degree programmes: master's programme in russian and european studies:
Faculty of ManagementUniversity of TampereSchool of Management
Master's Programme in Russian and European Studies

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Curricula guides

Nettiopsu for students

Study practices

Welcome to study in the Master’s Programme in Russian and European Studies!

In planning of the master's programme we have paid special attention on innovative learning methods.

Teaching consists of tutorials, lectures, e-learning, simulation exercises as well as active learning and problem-solving.

Studying in a Finnish university might differ from what you are used to, so we have collected some information on these pages to help you along, from the start of you studies to graduation.

You can find general information about studying in the RES programme on the links on the left and below.

 Studying in the University of Tampere

In general, the Finnish system of academic education gives students a lot of freedom to plan and schedule their studies. In the RES programme the schedule of obligatory courses is organised so that the students can complete all of them within two years, but students still have the independence in selecting their free choice studies according to their interest. You will be able to take courses from other disciplines and Schools that, for example, support your Thesis, or complete a module in a discipline which would better your chances of finding employment in a particular field.

There are many different ways to complete study modules and courses. In some of the modules the attendance is compulsory, as in MA thesis seminars, some can be completed by doing independent work, such as book examinations or essays. 

You can find more information on the study practices at

Study practices

The Finnish
system of academic education gives students a lot of freedom to plan and
schedule their studies. This means that planning the schedule for the academic
year, i.e. choosing the subjects and study modules, matching the times of lectures
and keeping the schedule intensive through­out the studies, requires a lot of
activity and responsibility on the part of the student. More independence is
given also by the free choice of minor subjects and courses from other
Departments and Faculties. If the students meet the prerequisites or pass an
initial language test, they are usually free to attend any course they might
want.

Both the
Bachelor’s and Master’s level programmes have many different ways for
completing the study modules. In some of the modules the attendance is
compulsory, as in BA/MA thesis seminars, some modules are to be completed by
doing independent work, such as book examinations, and some modules are
evaluated by final exams, essays or lecture diaries. The list below aims at
explaining the most common study practices at the University of Tampere.

For more extensive guidance on various types of academic texts, please see the Instructions for Writing Research Papers (pdf)

Lectures
Seminars
Essays
Lecture diaries
Book examinations
     General examination days
     Electronic exams
Bachelor's thesis
Master's thesis
Maturity test
Plagiarism
Providing constructive feedback
Grading scale

 

Lectures

Lectures
are a common method of study at the University
 of Tampere. They are
public, which means that anyone may attend. Lecture courses normally include
2-4 hours of lectures per week. Usually there is no registration required for
the lectures. In order to get credits for the lecture course, students must
usually either take an examination based on the lectures or write a lecture
diary.

 

Seminars

A
seminar consists of a small group of students who usually meet once a week for
one or two terms. Seminars normally require active participation in class, in
the form of writing an essay and/or giving a presentation and participating in
discussions. Size of the group is usually limited, and therefore students need
to register for seminars.

 

Essays

In
many courses, the student is required to write an essay on a topic defined by
the lecturer in order to receive credits. An essay is a scientific text, and
its aim is to survey literature and other material and present the student’s
own views on a given topic. Thus, it is not a summary of the source literature.
An essay consists of an introduction, main content, conclusion and a list of
references. It is important to notice that the main content should already
contain references to the reference list. The topic of an essay must always be
clearly defined. The length and layout of an essay are defined by the
department and lecturer in question. Sometimes it is also possible to complete
the whole course by writing an essay on a given topic, but this needs to be
negotiated with the teacher in charge of the course.

 

Lecture diaries

A
lecture diary is a written paper on the contents of the lectures. However, it
is not only a review of the lectures. A lecture diary is a way of reflecting on
what the student has learned through the lectures, and its aim is to summarize,
comment on and analyse the content of the lectures. The length and other
details of the lecture diary are determined by the lecturer in question,
normally during the first lecture.

Instructions for writing a lecture diary

Translated and edited by
Pekka Rantanen from Finnish instructions at Department of Social Research, University
 of Tampere

Lecture diary is not just
writing down what you have heard during the lecture or set of lectures. It
means more that you think about what you have heard and written down during the
lecture. The main idea in writing a lecture diary after the lecture is to
reflect on what you have heard, what thoughts and insights the lecture provided
about its subject matter and what questions and ideas the lecture has given to
you. It is always good to relate the lecture to the knowledge you have learned
elsewhere during your previous studies.

The lecture diary can be
organized in several ways. You can write a short account on every separate
lecture where you highlight the most important information and key insights of
the lecture. You can also take as a starting point the topics of lectures, or
problems that were presented, or write about the different views that were
presented during the lectures. Your lecture diary presents a condensed and
well-organized account of your notes that you wrote down during the lecture. It
is good if you are able write down your own reasoned insights and critique
about the lecture's subject matter.

A lecture diary may be
based on one lecture only, but it is often a case that a student is asked to
write a longer lecture diary that is based on a complete course. Please ask the
course coordinator for further information about the format and length of the
lecture diary. The coordinator of a course usually provides necessary technical
information about the lecture diary during the first session of the course.

 

Book Examinations

Some
courses may be completed by independent reading of literature included in the
course module requirements, followed by an exam on these set books. There are
two ways to take the book exams: either on Faculty general examination days or
as electronic exams. The book exam questions are usually essay questions, one or two on each book the student is taking.

Exams on general examination days

The
student has to sign up for the examination 7 days beforehand in Internet
through NettiOpsu or by filling in a sign-up envelope and returning it to the
department in question. Book examinations are taken on specific faculty
examination days usually arranged once a month. The time to complete the test
is four hours. Book examinations may also be taken during the summer time
(June-August).

If the
course module requirements include literature in Finnish, feel free to contact
the teacher in charge of the course module to find out if Finnish books could
be replaced. Note, that special arrangements must be announced upon enrolment.

Book
examination rules

-Before the
exam, wait outside the lecture hall. The supervisor of the exam (not
necessarily the teacher of your course) will come outside the lecture hall and
call students by their name. When you hear your name, take the question papers
or envelope from the supervisor and go into the lecture hall. Paper for your
answers will be available at the ends of the rows, you can take as many as you
think you will need.

- Find a
seat in the lecture hall. Do not sit next to anyone if there is room in the
lecture hall but leave an empty seat in between. Leave your bag and coat on the
floor at the end of the row. Take with you to your seat only the things you
need to write the exam, for instance a pen or a pencil and an eraser. Water
bottles are also allowed.

- Do not
open the question envelope or look at your questions before the supervisor
gives permission to do so. You need to wait until everyone is seated and when
everyone is ready, the supervisor will give permission to start.

- During
the exam, please do not talk and do not leave the lecture room without
permission. If you need anything, go to the supervisors of the exam to ask for
help.

- You will
have four hours to complete your exam. The exact time when you must finish will
be given when the exam starts. You will be allowed to leave the exam at the
earliest 20 minutes after the start of the exam. After the first 20 minutes,
you can leave anytime, as soon as you have finished the exam.

- When you
are finished, return your answers as well as the question papers to the
supervisor. You need to return the question paper even if you have not answered
any of the questions. When you hand in your papers, you need to show the
supervisor of the exam some ID, such as your UTA student ID or passport.
Remember to write your name on all of your answer papers!

 

Electronic exams

More and
more exams are offered in the electronic exam service, where students register
for the exam on the day and time of their choice, then take the exam on a
computer. There are two rooms reserved for electronic exams, one in Linna and
another in Pinni B.

You may not take anything with you into
the examination room. Before entering the examination room please leave your
outdoor clothing and bag on the pegs and in the lockers. In an electronic exam
you need no writing materials or paper and you need not prove your identity. All you need is your
passcard, which will gain you admission to the examination room,
where there is recorded video surveillance. Always use your passcard even if
you enter the room when other examinees open the door. The information left
from your passcard will be collated with your work in the examination and the
video recording to confirm your identity.

When you make
your reservation you will be given the number of the machine on which you are
to take your examination. The number of the computer will be on the upper edge
of the monitor. Don't worry if you cannot remember the number, if you try to
log in on the wrong machine it will tell you the number of the machine on which
you are to take your exam.

A list of
available exams can be found on the exam service pages.

For more information, visit the electronic exam service.

 

Bachelor’s thesis

Bachelor’s
thesis is a small independent research project carried out by the student
during the thesis seminar. The work is guided by the supervisor of the seminar
group. The required length of the thesis varies between departments, but
usually it is between 20 and 30 pages long. In connection to the thesis
seminar, students take the maturity test. The Bachelor’s thesis and
seminar are graded on the scale 1-5.

The thesis
process usually starts with the student choosing the topic and familiarising
themselves with relevant scientific discussion on it. The next step is to write
a more detailed research
plan. Based on their knowledge on relevant research literature, students
will be able to formulate a specific research question and relate it to
existing research. Students will also have to determine what kind of research material
is best suited to address their question and make decisions as to how to
compile that material.

The actual
analysis will be based on a limited set of research material. After having gone
through that material, all the time keeping in mind their main research
question, students will be able to reach conclusions of their own. The
thesis has to be outlined from a certain perspective, thought and analysed
independently. In addition it must fulfil the terms of academic writing.

More precise information on the requirements
in each major subject will be given in the thesis seminar.

 

Master´s Thesis

The
Master´s thesis is an independent piece of work by the student. Its meaning is
to train the student to scientific work in the field of her/his programme and
major subject. The thesis should show familiarity with the subject matter,
mastery of appropriate research methods and capability for scientific
expression. The extent of the Master´s thesis is 40 ECTS credits. The thesis
must be a minimum of 60 pages in length.

The
topic of the thesis is usually decided at latest during the seminar studies.
Usually a Professor or an Associate professor from the major subject Department
acts as a supervisor of the thesis writing. The work-in-progress is presented
and discussed in obligatory thesis seminars. After the submission of the
thesis, the student is required to take a maturity test before the thesis can
be assessed.

For more information, please see: Instructions for writing a master's
thesis and completing a Master's Degree -pdf

 

Maturity test

 

After you have submitted
your thesis, you are required to take a maturity test before the thesis can be
assessed. The maturity test is a written examination, which is taken on
the general examination day or as an electronic exam of the department
concerned. Registration is at least 10 days beforehand, using a normal
registration envelope; or with electronic exams, in the electronic exam service.
Registration is not possible before the thesis has been handed in. The maturity
test questions are given by the main examiner of the thesis.

The maturity test requires
an essay-type answer. Two or three alternative questions (which are used as the
title of the essay) are given on the general theme of your thesis - you choose
one of them. When writing the answer it should be kept in mind that the reader
is a person familiar with the scientific discipline in general but not
necessarily the specific subject of the thesis work. The maturity test answer
must be an independent entity which can be understood without any previous
knowledge of the actual thesis. The maturity test is examined by the
examiner(s) of the thesis.

You should pay special
attention to the language as the maturity test is also examined by an English
language examiner. The students in the programme with Finnish/Swedish
as the language of their elementary school education will write the test in
Finnish/Swedish, and it will be examined by a Finnish/Swedish language
examiner.

The maturity test must meet
the following minimum requirements (adapted from the instructions given by the
maturity test examiners from the University
 Language Center).

1.
Select one of the given topics. Write an essay with clear handwriting, the
length should be approximately four pages. Remember to leave margins on the
page. Do not forget the title.

2.  Writing should be well structured and form a
coherent whole. Division of chapters must be indicted clearly. Do not use
subtitles, pictures or charts.

3.
Stylistically the maturity test should be written according to the standards of
academic writing. Pay attention to the legibility and clarity of the text.

4.
Write your maturity test to an expert reader who is not familiar with your
thesis. Give enough information for the text to be understandable, but avoid
unnecessary repetition. Writing is not a memory test: do not just list the
things you remember but contemplate on your subject matter. Remember that the command
of both the entity and the language is evaluated.


5. Proofread your text.

 

Plagiarism policy

Plagiarism is a
serious academic offence! Plagiarism means using direct or paraphrased quotations or ideas from
other sources, including both print references and the internet, in your own
writing without specifically citing these in a way consistent with good
academic practice. Please note the following procedures if plagiarism is
detected:

University of Tampere  - Regulations for Evaluation
of Studies (http://www.uta.fi/studies/legislation/evaluation_regulations.html):

16 § Procedure if
cheating is detected

A student who is guilty of
cheating in an examination may be expelled immediately from the examination
room by the invigilator and his/her performance will be disqualified. The
performance shall also be rejected when the cheating is detected only after the
examination. Other performance may also be rejected if the student can be
proven to have cheated at the time. Cheating may lead to other disciplinary
measures under the legislation (Universities Act 645/97) 19 § and Universities
Decree (115/98).

Universities Act
645/97 (http://www.finlex.fi/en/laki/kaannokset/):

Section 19

Disciplinary action

(1) A student who has
committed an offence against teaching or research at the university may, as a
disciplinary measure, be given a caution or be suspended for a maximum of one
year. Provisions concerning the procedure shall be enacted by decree.

Universities Decree
115/98 (no
official English version available, only in Finnish or Swedish)

The rector of the
university will decide on the caution given for the offense against teaching or
research at the university referred to in the section 19 of the Universities
Act. The suspension mentioned in the same section of the Act will be decided by
the University Council. Before the matter is handled, the student will
demonstrably be provided with the information on what offense s/he is charged
with and offered an opportunity to be heard on the matter.

 

Providing constructive
feedback


   1. Focus on the contents of the essay, NOT on
           its author!

   2. Start with the strengths, not the
           weaknesses, of the work! Tell the writer what is valuable in the essay and
           give her/him ideas on how to make it even better!

   3. Your feedback should be specific and
           well-grounded; avoid unnecessary appraisal and generalisation.

   4. Give feedback on issues that can be
           changed or improved. Offer solutions.

   5. Be as neutral as possible. Keep in mind
           that the feedback you give is not the sole truth!

   6. You may focus on the following issues




        * Does the paper include a clearly stated
               research question?

        * Does it attempt to provide answers to that
               question?

        * Is the use of the source material
               critical, or does the text only paraphrase its sources? Are the
               sources cited correctly?

        * Is the text coherent? Are the paragraphs
               unified?

        * Does the language meet the standards of
               academic writing?  




Grading scale

The grading scale for courses and study modules is the following




ECTS grade
    UTA grade
    definition


A
    5
    excellent (erinomainen / ET)


B
    4
    very good (kiitettävä / KT)


C
    3
    good (hyvä / HT)


D
    2
    satisfactory (tyydyttävä / TT)


E
    1
    sufficient (välttävä / VT)



In the case of master’s and licentiates’ thesis and doctoral dissertations, the 7-tier grading scale in Latin (approbatur - laudatur) is usually used.

A    L, laudatur; E, eximia
B    M, magna cum laude approbatur
C    C, cum laude approbatur
D    N, non sine laude approbatur
E    B, lubenter approbatur; A, approbaturStudy practices

The Finnish
system of academic education gives students a lot of freedom to plan and
schedule their studies. This means that planning the schedule for the academic
year, i.e. choosing the subjects and study modules, matching the times of lectures
and keeping the schedule intensive through­out the studies, requires a lot of
activity and responsibility on the part of the student. More independence is
given also by the free choice of minor subjects and courses from other
Departments and Faculties. If the students meet the prerequisites or pass an
initial language test, they are usually free to attend any course they might
want.

Both the
Bachelor’s and Master’s level programmes have many different ways for
completing the study modules. In some of the modules the attendance is
compulsory, as in BA/MA thesis seminars, some modules are to be completed by
doing independent work, such as book examinations, and some modules are
evaluated by final exams, essays or lecture diaries. The list below aims at
explaining the most common study practices at the University of Tampere.

For more extensive guidance on various types of academic texts, please see the Instructions for Writing Research Papers (pdf)

Lectures
Seminars
Essays
Lecture diaries
Book examinations
     General examination days
     Electronic exams
Bachelor's thesis
Master's thesis
Maturity test
Plagiarism
Providing constructive feedback
Grading scale

 

Lectures

Lectures
are a common method of study at the University
 of Tampere. They are
public, which means that anyone may attend. Lecture courses normally include
2-4 hours of lectures per week. Usually there is no registration required for
the lectures. In order to get credits for the lecture course, students must
usually either take an examination based on the lectures or write a lecture
diary.

 

Seminars

A
seminar consists of a small group of students who usually meet once a week for
one or two terms. Seminars normally require active participation in class, in
the form of writing an essay and/or giving a presentation and participating in
discussions. Size of the group is usually limited, and therefore students need
to register for seminars.

 

Essays

In
many courses, the student is required to write an essay on a topic defined by
the lecturer in order to receive credits. An essay is a scientific text, and
its aim is to survey literature and other material and present the student’s
own views on a given topic. Thus, it is not a summary of the source literature.
An essay consists of an introduction, main content, conclusion and a list of
references. It is important to notice that the main content should already
contain references to the reference list. The topic of an essay must always be
clearly defined. The length and layout of an essay are defined by the
department and lecturer in question. Sometimes it is also possible to complete
the whole course by writing an essay on a given topic, but this needs to be
negotiated with the teacher in charge of the course.

 

Lecture diaries

A
lecture diary is a written paper on the contents of the lectures. However, it
is not only a review of the lectures. A lecture diary is a way of reflecting on
what the student has learned through the lectures, and its aim is to summarize,
comment on and analyse the content of the lectures. The length and other
details of the lecture diary are determined by the lecturer in question,
normally during the first lecture.

Instructions for writing a lecture diary

Translated and edited by
Pekka Rantanen from Finnish instructions at Department of Social Research, University
 of Tampere

Lecture diary is not just
writing down what you have heard during the lecture or set of lectures. It
means more that you think about what you have heard and written down during the
lecture. The main idea in writing a lecture diary after the lecture is to
reflect on what you have heard, what thoughts and insights the lecture provided
about its subject matter and what questions and ideas the lecture has given to
you. It is always good to relate the lecture to the knowledge you have learned
elsewhere during your previous studies.

The lecture diary can be
organized in several ways. You can write a short account on every separate
lecture where you highlight the most important information and key insights of
the lecture. You can also take as a starting point the topics of lectures, or
problems that were presented, or write about the different views that were
presented during the lectures. Your lecture diary presents a condensed and
well-organized account of your notes that you wrote down during the lecture. It
is good if you are able write down your own reasoned insights and critique
about the lecture's subject matter.

A lecture diary may be
based on one lecture only, but it is often a case that a student is asked to
write a longer lecture diary that is based on a complete course. Please ask the
course coordinator for further information about the format and length of the
lecture diary. The coordinator of a course usually provides necessary technical
information about the lecture diary during the first session of the course.

 

Book Examinations

Some
courses may be completed by independent reading of literature included in the
course module requirements, followed by an exam on these set books. There are
two ways to take the book exams: either on Faculty general examination days or
as electronic exams. The book exam questions are usually essay questions, one or two on each book the student is taking.

Exams on general examination days

The
student has to sign up for the examination 7 days beforehand in Internet
through NettiOpsu or by filling in a sign-up envelope and returning it to the
department in question. Book examinations are taken on specific faculty
examination days usually arranged once a month. The time to complete the test
is four hours. Book examinations may also be taken during the summer time
(June-August).

If the
course module requirements include literature in Finnish, feel free to contact
the teacher in charge of the course module to find out if Finnish books could
be replaced. Note, that special arrangements must be announced upon enrolment.

Book
examination rules

-Before the
exam, wait outside the lecture hall. The supervisor of the exam (not
necessarily the teacher of your course) will come outside the lecture hall and
call students by their name. When you hear your name, take the question papers
or envelope from the supervisor and go into the lecture hall. Paper for your
answers will be available at the ends of the rows, you can take as many as you
think you will need.

- Find a
seat in the lecture hall. Do not sit next to anyone if there is room in the
lecture hall but leave an empty seat in between. Leave your bag and coat on the
floor at the end of the row. Take with you to your seat only the things you
need to write the exam, for instance a pen or a pencil and an eraser. Water
bottles are also allowed.

- Do not
open the question envelope or look at your questions before the supervisor
gives permission to do so. You need to wait until everyone is seated and when
everyone is ready, the supervisor will give permission to start.

- During
the exam, please do not talk and do not leave the lecture room without
permission. If you need anything, go to the supervisors of the exam to ask for
help.

- You will
have four hours to complete your exam. The exact time when you must finish will
be given when the exam starts. You will be allowed to leave the exam at the
earliest 20 minutes after the start of the exam. After the first 20 minutes,
you can leave anytime, as soon as you have finished the exam.

- When you
are finished, return your answers as well as the question papers to the
supervisor. You need to return the question paper even if you have not answered
any of the questions. When you hand in your papers, you need to show the
supervisor of the exam some ID, such as your UTA student ID or passport.
Remember to write your name on all of your answer papers!

 

Electronic exams

More and
more exams are offered in the electronic exam service, where students register
for the exam on the day and time of their choice, then take the exam on a
computer. There are two rooms reserved for electronic exams, one in Linna and
another in Pinni B.

You may not take anything with you into
the examination room. Before entering the examination room please leave your
outdoor clothing and bag on the pegs and in the lockers. In an electronic exam
you need no writing materials or paper and you need not prove your identity. All you need is your
passcard, which will gain you admission to the examination room,
where there is recorded video surveillance. Always use your passcard even if
you enter the room when other examinees open the door. The information left
from your passcard will be collated with your work in the examination and the
video recording to confirm your identity.

When you make
your reservation you will be given the number of the machine on which you are
to take your examination. The number of the computer will be on the upper edge
of the monitor. Don't worry if you cannot remember the number, if you try to
log in on the wrong machine it will tell you the number of the machine on which
you are to take your exam.

A list of
available exams can be found on the exam service pages.

For more information, visit the electronic exam service.

 

Bachelor’s thesis

Bachelor’s
thesis is a small independent research project carried out by the student
during the thesis seminar. The work is guided by the supervisor of the seminar
group. The required length of the thesis varies between departments, but
usually it is between 20 and 30 pages long. In connection to the thesis
seminar, students take the maturity test. The Bachelor’s thesis and
seminar are graded on the scale 1-5.

The thesis
process usually starts with the student choosing the topic and familiarising
themselves with relevant scientific discussion on it. The next step is to write
a more detailed research
plan. Based on their knowledge on relevant research literature, students
will be able to formulate a specific research question and relate it to
existing research. Students will also have to determine what kind of research material
is best suited to address their question and make decisions as to how to
compile that material.

The actual
analysis will be based on a limited set of research material. After having gone
through that material, all the time keeping in mind their main research
question, students will be able to reach conclusions of their own. The
thesis has to be outlined from a certain perspective, thought and analysed
independently. In addition it must fulfil the terms of academic writing.

More precise information on the requirements
in each major subject will be given in the thesis seminar.

 

Master´s Thesis

The
Master´s thesis is an independent piece of work by the student. Its meaning is
to train the student to scientific work in the field of her/his programme and
major subject. The thesis should show familiarity with the subject matter,
mastery of appropriate research methods and capability for scientific
expression. The extent of the Master´s thesis is 40 ECTS credits. The thesis
must be a minimum of 60 pages in length.

The
topic of the thesis is usually decided at latest during the seminar studies.
Usually a Professor or an Associate professor from the major subject Department
acts as a supervisor of the thesis writing. The work-in-progress is presented
and discussed in obligatory thesis seminars. After the submission of the
thesis, the student is required to take a maturity test before the thesis can
be assessed.

For more information, please see: Instructions for writing a master's
thesis and completing a Master's Degree -pdf

 

Maturity test

 

After you have submitted
your thesis, you are required to take a maturity test before the thesis can be
assessed. The maturity test is a written examination, which is taken on
the general examination day or as an electronic exam of the department
concerned. Registration is at least 10 days beforehand, using a normal
registration envelope; or with electronic exams, in the electronic exam service.
Registration is not possible before the thesis has been handed in. The maturity
test questions are given by the main examiner of the thesis.

The maturity test requires
an essay-type answer. Two or three alternative questions (which are used as the
title of the essay) are given on the general theme of your thesis - you choose
one of them. When writing the answer it should be kept in mind that the reader
is a person familiar with the scientific discipline in general but not
necessarily the specific subject of the thesis work. The maturity test answer
must be an independent entity which can be understood without any previous
knowledge of the actual thesis. The maturity test is examined by the
examiner(s) of the thesis.

You should pay special
attention to the language as the maturity test is also examined by an English
language examiner. The students in the programme with Finnish/Swedish
as the language of their elementary school education will write the test in
Finnish/Swedish, and it will be examined by a Finnish/Swedish language
examiner.

The maturity test must meet
the following minimum requirements (adapted from the instructions given by the
maturity test examiners from the University
 Language Center).

1.
Select one of the given topics. Write an essay with clear handwriting, the
length should be approximately four pages. Remember to leave margins on the
page. Do not forget the title.

2.  Writing should be well structured and form a
coherent whole. Division of chapters must be indicted clearly. Do not use
subtitles, pictures or charts.

3.
Stylistically the maturity test should be written according to the standards of
academic writing. Pay attention to the legibility and clarity of the text.

4.
Write your maturity test to an expert reader who is not familiar with your
thesis. Give enough information for the text to be understandable, but avoid
unnecessary repetition. Writing is not a memory test: do not just list the
things you remember but contemplate on your subject matter. Remember that the command
of both the entity and the language is evaluated.


5. Proofread your text.

 

Plagiarism policy

Plagiarism is a
serious academic offence! Plagiarism means using direct or paraphrased quotations or ideas from
other sources, including both print references and the internet, in your own
writing without specifically citing these in a way consistent with good
academic practice. Please note the following procedures if plagiarism is
detected:

University of Tampere  - Regulations for Evaluation
of Studies (http://www.uta.fi/studies/legislation/evaluation_regulations.html):

16 § Procedure if
cheating is detected

A student who is guilty of
cheating in an examination may be expelled immediately from the examination
room by the invigilator and his/her performance will be disqualified. The
performance shall also be rejected when the cheating is detected only after the
examination. Other performance may also be rejected if the student can be
proven to have cheated at the time. Cheating may lead to other disciplinary
measures under the legislation (Universities Act 645/97) 19 § and Universities
Decree (115/98).

Universities Act
645/97 (http://www.finlex.fi/en/laki/kaannokset/):

Section 19

Disciplinary action

(1) A student who has
committed an offence against teaching or research at the university may, as a
disciplinary measure, be given a caution or be suspended for a maximum of one
year. Provisions concerning the procedure shall be enacted by decree.

Universities Decree
115/98 (no
official English version available, only in Finnish or Swedish)

The rector of the
university will decide on the caution given for the offense against teaching or
research at the university referred to in the section 19 of the Universities
Act. The suspension mentioned in the same section of the Act will be decided by
the University Council. Before the matter is handled, the student will
demonstrably be provided with the information on what offense s/he is charged
with and offered an opportunity to be heard on the matter.

 

Providing constructive
feedback


   1. Focus on the contents of the essay, NOT on
           its author!

   2. Start with the strengths, not the
           weaknesses, of the work! Tell the writer what is valuable in the essay and
           give her/him ideas on how to make it even better!

   3. Your feedback should be specific and
           well-grounded; avoid unnecessary appraisal and generalisation.

   4. Give feedback on issues that can be
           changed or improved. Offer solutions.

   5. Be as neutral as possible. Keep in mind
           that the feedback you give is not the sole truth!

   6. You may focus on the following issues




        * Does the paper include a clearly stated
               research question?

        * Does it attempt to provide answers to that
               question?

        * Is the use of the source material
               critical, or does the text only paraphrase its sources? Are the
               sources cited correctly?

        * Is the text coherent? Are the paragraphs
               unified?

        * Does the language meet the standards of
               academic writing?  




Grading scale

The grading scale for courses and study modules is the following




ECTS grade
    UTA grade
    definition


A
    5
    excellent (erinomainen / ET)


B
    4
    very good (kiitettävä / KT)


C
    3
    good (hyvä / HT)


D
    2
    satisfactory (tyydyttävä / TT)


E
    1
    sufficient (välttävä / VT)



In the case of master’s and licentiates’ thesis and doctoral dissertations, the 7-tier grading scale in Latin (approbatur - laudatur) is usually used.

A    L, laudatur; E, eximia
B    M, magna cum laude approbatur
C    C, cum laude approbatur
D    N, non sine laude approbatur
E    B, lubenter approbatur; A, approbatur
 
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Last update: 5.11.2015 16.18 Muokkaa

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+358 3 355 111
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