Study Practices

University studies are very independent in nature. Academic freedom and the responsibility for one’s own studies and their progress are essential elements of university studies. University students are expected to be capable of planning their studies and acquiring the necessary information independently.

On certain grounds, students can apply for special arrangements in order to help them complete their studies and achieve the desired learning outcomes. A hearing, visual or other sensory impairment; dyslexia; panic disorder; ADHD or Asperger syndrome can be considered to constitute special grounds. More information on special arrangements is primarily available from the accessibility contact person. Please see the additional instructions on the Accessibility page.

Give feedback. Students are expected to give feedback on all course units in which they participate. Feedback that is as accurate and honest as possible is important for the development of education. Quality from Student's Perspective

Students have the right to obtain information about the grading of their exams and assignments. According to the University’s Regulations on the Assessment of Studies, instructors are obliged to keep the grading information for six months. Regulations related to studies

Do not plagiarise works or give anything you have written to another person for the purposes of plagiarism. Plagiarism is prohibited at all study phases and in all course units. Instructors compare completed assignments and exams with each other and with other electronic materials. According to academic practices, references must be used to indicate citations of the work or text of another. For example, a direct quotation must always be placed in quotation marks with an indication of the source. In unclear cases, it is advisable to consult an instructor. Separate procedures are available for the processing of cases of plagiarism and other academic fraud (please see also the information on the intranet).

Use your university email when communicating with your teachers or other university staff.

Faculty of Communication Sciences

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Faculty of Education

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Faculty of Management

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Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences

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Faculty of Natural Sciences

University studies are very independent in nature. Academic freedom and the responsibility for one’s own studies and their progress are essential elements of university studies. University students are expected to be capable of planning their studies and acquiring the necessary information independently.

On certain grounds, students can apply for special arrangements in order to help them complete their studies and achieve the desired learning outcomes. A hearing, visual or other sensory impairment; dyslexia; panic disorder; ADHD or Asperger syndrome can be considered to constitute special grounds. More information on special arrangements is primarily available from the accessibility contact person. Please see the additional instructions on the Accessibility page.

Give feedback. Students are expected to give feedback on all course units in which they participate. Feedback that is as accurate and honest as possible is important for the development of education. You can naturally give feedback under your own name by e-mailing or speaking to an instructor, but instructors are also obliged to provide the opportunity to submit anonymous feedback. However, anonymous feedback can only be submitted on designated forms. Feedback that is submitted anonymously by other means or via e-mail accounts that conceal the sender’s real name will not be read or responded to. Students have the right to obtain information about the grading of their exams and assignments. According to the University’s Regulations on the Assessment of Studies, instructors are obliged to keep the grading information for six months.

Do not plagiarise works or give anything you have written to another person for the purposes of plagiarism. Plagiarism is prohibited at all study phases and in all course units. Instructors compare completed assignments and exams with each other and with other electronic materials. According to academic practices, references must be used to indicate citations of the work or text of another. For example, a direct quotation must always be placed in quotation marks with an indication of the source. In unclear cases, it is advisable to consult an instructor. Separate procedures are available for the processing of cases of plagiarism and other academic fraud (please see also the information on the intranet).

Quality from Student's Perspective

Regulations related to studies

Degree Programme in Mathematics and Statistics

Nature of the studies

The course units in Mathematics and Statistics normally consist of lectures and assignments. Course units in Statistics may entail an assignment that involves resolving an empirical statistical problem and reporting the results. The proportion spacing of assignments is essential in the learning process. Persistent work that is spread out evenly across the duration of the course usually ensures optimal results. Literature is almost always defined for each course for use during lectures or in support of the lectures. Course units are usually completed by means of mid-term or final exams.

Studies in Mathematics

Active mathematical skills include the proper handling of course assignments, which can only be learned through active coursework. Completing and solving assignments and exercises sheds light on the theories taught in class and helps you to adopt the ways of thinking that should be learned through the studies. Study the lessons covered during lectures carefully and ensure that you understand even the hardest parts. If you find something particularly difficult to understand, you should invest even more care and effort in learning it.

Acquiring mathematical knowledge requires greater than average concentration and the patience to learn the new concepts and study the deductions and results attained. In mathematical studies, it is not enough to learn things by heart. You must understand the underlying mechanisms and relationships, and be able to call upon them in a variety of contexts. Once you properly understand a lesson, you no longer need to rely on memory alone.

Studies in Statistics

Especially in bachelor’s degree studies, practical applications are particularly important, which is why the studies include a consistent module of free choice studies (free choice studies 1). Recommendations on module content are provided in the section Free Choice Studies in the Degree Programme.

Studies in IT and computer sciences are very important for studies in Statistics. This is especially true of the Master’s Degree Programme in Computational Big Data Analytics . The rapid development of computer hardware and software has increased the application of statistics significantly. Alongside the analysis of empirical observation data, computers are used to visualise and structure data and concepts in the theoretical study of statistics. Easy-to-use statistical software that do not require studies in Computer Sciences are utilised in the basic courses.

Degree Programme in Computer Sciences

Instructions and rules related to studies

Studies in Computer Sciences are arranged in course form. To proceed in your studies, you must complete course units that last one or more periods. For this reason, the studies require persistence and systematic time use. The aim is to organise the courses in such a way that students adhering to the recommended course order can transition smoothly from one course to the next and avoid course attendance overlap.

The most important instructions for studying Computer Sciences can be summarised as follows:

  1. Working during semesters has been shown to slow down the pace of studies, which is why you should refrain from working at least during the first three years of your studies.
  2. Plan your use of time realistically; keep a weekly schedule. Partially completed coursework from a dropped course is generally not accepted if you choose to take the course again.
  3. Studies and working life go hand in hand. Learn to work responsibly as part of a team.

Your right to study is not unlimited. In addition to the recommended time to complete the degrees (3+2 years), you only have one extra year for each degree. Gainful employment during semesters will require you to put a lot of effort into your studies in your spare time, and it is very easy to fall behind the recommended schedule for completing course units. This results in difficulties that delay studies, as it becomes harder and harder to pick and complete courses when you do not meet all the preconditions.

Course arrangements are planned with the assumption that all students will be studying full-time. This means that working is not considered to constitute sufficient grounds for requesting a course instructor to provide special arrangements or for receiving extra time to complete a degree.

Dropping courses wastes the resources of both the student and the instructor, and it is often harmful to other students as well. At the beginning of each semester, you should plan your time realistically and only include in your schedule courses that you can feasibly complete. One should also note that partial coursework completed during a dropped course (assignments or mandatory weekly exercises, for example) is generally not accepted if you choose to take the course again. A course instructor may make an exception in this regard; if so, this will be indicated at the beginning of the course in question. Exceptions granted by an individual instructor are not binding on any other instructor who may hold the same course at a later time.

Many courses in Computer Sciences involve learning teamwork skills – which are essential in employment – by completing various exercises in groups. Be fair towards your teammates and complete your share of the work. Please consider carefully whether or not you should take a course that includes group work, as discontinuing the course will cause problems for the other group members.

Faculty of Social Sciences

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Language Centre

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